Weapons Detection Is “Eye Opening”

Weapons Detection Technology

A recent article in the Intelligencer, “Area school districts eyeing up weapons detection systems” provides great insight into the ZeroEyes solution. Writer Christian Menno covers the story. There is a clear need for added layers of security within school systems now. A growing trend of active shooter scenarios and rising anxiety about such events is the root cause. Weapons detection technology makes it possible for school officials to have greater situational awareness than ever before.

Menno’s article covers a recent demonstration ZeroEyes performed for Access Security. ZeroEyes’ Dustin Brooks and Sam Alaimo are both former Navy SEALs. This military experience uniquely equips the ZeroEyes team to address these dangerous situations. Brooks says, “We know what an active shooter scenario looks like…we know what these people involved are thinking and how they feel.” This is their greatest differentiator compared to other weapons detection solutions on the market.

Putting Weapons Detection To The Test

One of the challenges with this kind of technology is being able to test it’s accuracy. For the last several months, ZeroEyes has been developing its machine learning algorithm at Rancocas Valley Regional High School. Periodically the ZeroEyes team shows up on site with plastic guns they show to existing security cameras. In addition, the images are processed in real time using ZeroEyes AI software. From these images, the machine learns how to better detect weapons on camera. Over time the AI becomes stronger, and better able to perform its function.

One of the integral parts of this detection system are the alerts. ZeroEyes’ system is not only able to identify weapons, but they can capture information and send it to the appropriate authorities. The information a security camera captures includes things like: the number of shooters, what weapons they have, where they are located, where they are going, etc. This is vital information for first responders or on-site security officers. However, without that kind of intelligence, people are largely moving blind. Therefore, this new kind of data could save seconds, which can save lives.

Seconds Matter

One of the attendees at the demonstration was Val Ridge, Bensalem’s safety and security coordinator. Previously, Ridge was a Bensalem police officer for about 11 years. Ridge said,

“If we can provide that one extra layer of security, I’m looking for it…these guys have lived it. They know it. Seconds matter. They understand what those seconds mean.”

Another impressed attendee was Tony Keokham, Neshaminy’s Facilities Supervisor. He referred to weapons detection as the “first line of defense.” It is definitely not the sole or only line of defense, but it can provide a tremendous amount of security and peace of mind.

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